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  • Writer's pictureRubi Carranza

Estate Planning for Individuals with Alzheimer's or Dementia: Ensuring Your Wishes are Followed

As we journey through life, we may face many challenges, and for some, Alzheimer's or dementia may be one of them. These conditions can make it challenging to make decisions, including those related to your estate. That's why it's essential to plan ahead with estate planning for individuals with Alzheimer's or dementia.




Firstly, it's important to understand that individuals with Alzheimer's or dementia may still be able to make legal decisions early on in the disease's progression. However, as the disease progresses, they may become unable to make legal decisions or may make decisions that do not align with their wishes. That's why it's essential to have legal documents in place early on, such as a durable power of attorney and a living will.


A durable power of attorney is a legal document that designates someone to make financial and legal decisions on your behalf if you become unable to do so. This document can be tailored to your specific needs and can also specify when the agent's authority begins and ends.


A living will, on the other hand, is a legal document that outlines your wishes for medical treatment if you become incapacitated and are unable to communicate your desires. This document can include decisions about life-sustaining treatments, pain management, and end-of-life care.


It's also crucial to involve family members or close friends in the planning process to ensure that everyone understands your wishes and can help carry them out. This can also help reduce conflicts and ensure that your estate is managed according to your wishes.


Lastly, it's important to work with an experienced estate planning attorney who understands the unique needs of individuals with Alzheimer's or dementia. They can guide you through the planning process, help you make informed decisions, and ensure that your legal documents are up-to-date and valid.


In conclusion, estate planning for individuals with Alzheimer's or dementia is a critical step in ensuring that your wishes are followed and that your estate is managed properly. With the right legal documents in place, involving loved ones, and working with an experienced estate planning attorney, you can have peace of mind knowing that your affairs are in order. If you have any questions or would like to discuss your estate planning needs, please do not hesitate to call our firm at (305) 359-3888. We are here to help you navigate this journey with care and compassion.



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